Case Studies for Margaret T. Debler

2018 WL 1637946. RSJA successfully defended the township against allegations of illegal seizure after a police pursuit. Over time, the plaintiff and her relations have been the subject of multiple criminal prosecutions in the township and neighboring communities. RSJA has successfully defended several mandamus actions against judges and township officials and criminal appeals brought by these individuals, as well as defending a township ordinance officer in getting wrongful prosecution claims against him dismissed.
2016 WL 795901 (ED Mich 2016). The case alleged excessive force by township officers and sheriff’s department deputies. RSJA obtained a dismissal on the merits for the township, saving fees, costs and a potential judgment, while the plaintiff was able to proceed against the county defendants.
2013 WL 2319323 (ED Mich, 2013). RSJA successfully defended claims brought by the Estate of a mentally-ill individual who, while suffering from excited delirium, led township police officers on a multi-city pursuit and was subject to 30+ police Taser deployments. Securing summary judgment on behalf of the township and its officers, RSJA attorneys relied (among other cases) on Caie v West Bloomfield, 485 Fed Appx 92 (6th Cir, 2012), a case successfully litigated by RSJA’s Margaret Debler and frequently cited by the Sixth Circuit when affirming summary judgment. (Caie involved police and fire response to a mental health seizure, where a Taser was used to apprehend the at-risk teen. RSJA successfully obtained summary judgment as to fire fighters in this significant mental health seizure case where force was necessary.)
676 Fed Appx 466 (6th Cir, 2017). The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the district court’s denial of qualified immunity and held that the defendant paramedic did not violate the plaintiff’s clearly-established Fourth Amendment rights by grabbing the plaintiff, who was being aggressive, and forcing her to the floor and, thus, was entitled to qualified immunity in her federal use of force action. The paramedic acted reasonably by intervening because reasonable an officer in her position would have found intervention necessary, various factors could have led paramedic to believe that her use of force was necessary, citizen was second-degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do and knew how to fight, citizen acted aggressively in front of paramedic by yelling obscenities, throwing her phone, and walking angrily toward another paramedic, and police officer told citizen immediately before paramedic intervened that citizen needed to stop fighting him.